In late fall, pre – winter, colors of the tundra and the species that roam the land come to a crossroads of earth tones. This pallet gradually transitions into a great white north we all think of when envisioning the forthcoming and exciting polar bear season. This time is short though one of the most beautiful in the Arctic and surrounding regions.

red fox Churchill

Multi colored red fox with the colors of the textured tundra behind. Katie deMeulles photo.

Each year during polar bear season in Churchill either red or Arctic foxes tend to be the more prevalent species for that particular season. In recent years there has been an influx of red foxes that have seemingly displaced the gorgeous, white coated Arctic fox population to some extent. Hunting, legal and illegal, has also played a role in lowering the Arctic fox numbers. Warming temperatures facilitate the red fox species to become more adaptive to the northern weather and even ice conditions in winter. The patchwork colors of the red fox in particular meld with the myriad of tundra color splashes.

Precambrian shield in Churchill.

The colors of the tundra deep into fall in Churchill. Ed Bouvier photo.


Polar bear in Churchill,MB.

Early season photo of a sleepy polar bear. Paul Brown photo.

While snow is imminent in the Churchill region, polar bears will take this time to conserve energy by limiting movement as much as possible. Sleeping bears will soon be wandering restlessly as the snow falls and temperatures drop to freezing or lower by month’s end. Polar bears gazing toward the Hudson Bay in anticipation of a freeze over will become the norm as November marches on.

Lichen on the rocks in Churchill.

Lichen growing on rocks in Churchill. Steve Selden photo.


Silver fox scouring tundra for lemmings. Colby Brokvist photo

Silver fox scouring tundra for lemmings. Colby Brokvist photo.

The tundra will release the last fruits of its bounty to the scouring animals looking to nurture their bodies with berries, plants or lemmings before the winter hits hard. Changing appearances in foxes, hares and birds foretell the new season that will become a energetic forum of multiple species before the freeze leads to mass exodus lead especially by the king of the Arctic, the mighty polar bear.

Snowy owl on the tundra.

Snowy owl on the tundra in the CWMA. Colby Brokvist photo.


Gyr Falcon. Churchill

A Gyrfalcon in the late fall in Churchill. Brad Josephs photo.

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