Iqaluit Snowstorm Rings In Fall

This early season in Nunavut’s capital city Iqaluit has signaled the beginning of a northern winter season. All across the Arctic and sub- Arctic, the temperatures are dropping and snow has either fallen or soon will be blowing in the air across tundra and Precambrian rock outcrops.

Churchill’s polar bear season, which begins in a week, will take on a different feel this year as the Hudson Bay Rail line is still inoperable and repairs are surely not going to be initiated before spring at this juncture. Hopes are high for an influx of travelers by air coming as usual to see the magnificent polar bears and other Arctic wildlife roaming the Churchill Wildlife Management Area and in the bluffs of Cape Merry. Their presence will give hope both financially and spiritually to Churchillians trying to withstand the isolation and strife the disaster to the rail – line has caused since last May.

Stay posted to our site for all the normal exciting news from polar bear season as well as updates on how townsfolk are dealing with no train service. Should be an exciting season with lots of news from Churchill!

Polar Bears Across and Above the Tundra

Polar bear season in Churchill is now in full swing as the colder temperatures are more prevalent around the region.Tundra ponds or thermokarsts are all frozen in the Churchill Wildlife Management Area and the polar bears are active with massive sparring bouts thrilling travelers. The Churchill River is also almost frozen after initially forming around the spit of Cape Merry.Some pack ice is also beginning to form in the Hudson Bay which is about a week early by some accounts.

Natural Habitat Adventures guides are having success at locating polar bears near the Tundra Lodge where sparring has been a daily attraction. Guide Justin Gibson commented, “there were more bears than I have ever seen at the lodge this early in the season”, sparring non – stop. Bear viewing in general has been “awesome” according to Justin.With more and more polar bears arriving to the area each day it will only get better!

Enjoy these fresh photos from Churchill by Justin!

Polar bear in Churchill

Poalr bear afraid to look at all the polar rovers. Justin Gibson photo.

Polar bear churchill wildlife management area

Sparring polar bears near the tundra lodge in the Churchill Wildlife Management Area. Justin Gibson photo.

Natural Habitat tundra lodge group

Natural Habitat Adventures Tundra Lodge group posing in front of inukshuk by the Hudson Bay. Justin Gibson photo.

polar bear lift in churchill

Manitoba Conservation netting a few polar bears for a lift. Justin GIbson photo.

polar bear lift in Churchill

Polar bear lift in Churchill. Justin Gibson photo.

polar bear lift in Churchill, Manitoba

Polar bear lift just about to leave the ground in Churchill. Justin Gibson photo.

Notes From the Field – Churchill Arctic Summer

Churchill’s Arctic summer season for Natural Habitat Adventures groups has been incredibly exciting so far. Aside from the bountiful array of beluga whales in the Churchill River and Hudson Bay, there’s been some polar bear action out on Eskimo point just north of Fort Prince of Wales. This peninsula of land juts into the bay and the isostatic rebound over the years has caused the land to emerge from the water and grow in size.
Polar bear churchill

Male polar bear holding his position on Eskimo Point. Moira Le Patourel photo.

The “point” has also become traditional resting spot for polar bears in the summer months and quite often mother’s and cubs are found there. Because it is somewhat isolated from the town, it may attract bears hoping to nab a seal or beluga whale venturing too close to shore. I have seen bears swimming across from Cape merry over the years and a couple of times we were able to approach them fairly closely in zodiacs.
polar bear churchill, Manitoba

Male polar bear on Eskimo Point. Moira Le Patourel photo.

Natural Habitat guide Moira Le Patourel and her group of travelers spotted three polar bears in this area just a few days ago. These were the first such sightings of this incredible Arctic summer campaign. The first healthy adult male polar bear was seen from Cape Merry with a spotting scope looking across to Eskimo Point. A little later the group was able to get up close in zodiacs during a whale watching excursion. What a way to see two of the largest animals in the Arctic at the same time.
Mother and cub polar bear Churchill, MB

Mother and her cub on the tip of Eskimo Point. Moira Le Patourel photo.

Continuing out into the crystal clear waters of the Hudson Bay, the group came to the tip of the point and was surprised by a mom and cub nestled in the rocks and enjoying a beautiful day in the north. Travelers were ecstatic with their fortune!
Travelers on this trip took advantage of the fantastic water clarity and engaged in some snorkeling with belugas in the Churchill River and kayaking with the whales as well. One tandem kayak had the incredible thrill of getting “fluked” as a beluga slapped the water with his tail as he submerged for a dive. Water cascaded over the travelers and their boats.
The icing on the was documenting 31 various bird species over the course of the trip. Highlights were a short-eared owl,  northern goshawk, pacific loons and young, tundra swans and cygnets and an Arctic tern chick.
Churchill sunset and beach.

Sunset from the beach in Churchill. Moira Le Patourel photo.

Fireweed is beginning to bloom across the tundra and white mountain avens are fast disappearing…summer is already half over in Churchill!

 

Polar Bear Video from Churchill River

Summer on the Churchill River is predominately for beluga whale watching. However, occasionally each season presents the amazing opportunity to view polar bears on the rocks around Cape Merry or Eskimo Point just north of Fort Prince of Wales across river. This video was filmed by Sea North Tours near Eskimo Point and the sow and cub polar bears are in clear view. What an unbelievable experience for all travelers lucky enough to be aboard the zodiacs in Churchill!

Five Must See’s in Churchill

If you take an adventure to Churchill in the near future there are some “must see” attractions you should take in before you leave the frontier town. Of course some are season specific while some are year round accessible.

1.- Polar Bears: Not many people are unaware that Churchill is the polar bear mecca for viewing the “king of the Arctic”. During October and November the town is filled with high numbers of travelers hoping to see these amazing creatures in the wild. Of course summer also holds the potential for sighting fewer numbers of polar bears but still the chance exists. If you come during the winter to perhaps view northern lights, you will not see any as they are hunting seals on the Hudson bay ice. So plan a trip during the optimal window and come see the polar bears of Churchill!

Polar bears sparring in Churchill, MB.

Polar bears sparring in the Churchill wildlife management Area. Natural Habitat Adventures photo.

2. Precambrian Shield: When in Churchill you will notice the rocky coastline and glacial  polished rocks jutting out of the tundra in different areas of the surrounding area. You really will need to get out on the Precambrian shield and feel the energy that emanates from the heavy stone embedded in the Earth. The geological features are wondrous and magnificent and are some of the oldest rocks on the planet. You can easily become immersed in the natural history of the formations and see how the landscape adapts to their shape and movement.

Cape Merry with a view to Fort Prince of Wales in Churchill, Manitoba

A view across the Cape Merry barrens past the battery and to Fort prince of Wales. Natural Habitat Adventures photo.

3. Churchill Northern Studies Center and surrounding area: At the far reaches of the main road out of Churchill heading east lies the old Fort Churchill Rocket Range. These grounds are now occupied by the new and improved Churchill Northern Studies Center. The center is a bastion for Arctic researchers and travelers to live and learn from the incredible diversity of the ecosystems colliding in one place. A tour of the facility and exploring the lakes and patterned ground in the area via trails is a must for getting a feel for the true sub-Arctic biome.

Churchill northern Studies Center

Churchill Northern Studies Center. CNSC photo.

4. Northern Lights: Another fairly obvious “must see” in Churchill. Located under Van Allens belt in the magnetic field of our atmosphere, Churchill is an optimal location to take in these mystical and scintillating lights. Natural Habitat Adventures has a new option to view the aurora; an Aurora Pod. With other various viewing options available as well, this is an absolute must see in Churchill.

Natural Habitat's Aurora Pod Churchill, MB

Natural Habitat’s Aurora Pod and an avid photographer. Alex de Vries – Magnifico photo.

5. -Cape Merry: This is probably the most beautiful and peaceful spot around Churchill. When guiding Churchill Arctic summer groups I would always bring the group there first as a relaxing orientation to the region. We would spend hours looking for flowers and studying the geology of the area. Fort Prince of Wales is just across the Churchill River (often teeming with beluga whales in summer) and the vast expanse of the Hudson Bay unveils itself as far as the eye can see.

Ammunition cache at Cape Merry.

Ammunition cache at Cape Merry for cannon protection of Fort prince of Wales. Karen Walker photo.

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