Arctic Landscapes – Coral Harbour

This incredible vast landscape shot near Coral Harbour by Wanda Nakoolak gives a feel of endless space in the Arctic. The Kirchoffer bridge allows access to Kirchoffer Falls which is located about 15 miles from Coral Harbour from the airport road. The falls themselves are 25 feet high and surrounded by a rugged, rocky landscape.

The bridge, which spans the Kirchoffer River, was constructed to allow hunters to cross over especially during the caribou harvest every year. Nesting sites for gyrfalcons and peregrine falcons on the cliffs near the majestic Kirchoffer River provide birders and wildlife enthusiasts.

Churchill Video of the Week – Caribou Migration

Caribou are an intrinsic part of the northern ecosystem and cover a wide area of the landscape at times when the migration is in full swing. This northern video of a massive migration across the tundra gives a glimpse of the immensity of a full-scale herd on the move. While Churchill is part of the migration route, most herd sightings occur out at Cape Churchill near Wapusk National Park.Caribou wander into the Churchill Wildlife Management Area and often can be spotted out near the coast as well. I have seen parts of migratory herds but never a full-scale herd on the land. On my bucket list for sure. Enjoy!

Churchill Summer Treasures

These amazing images from Churchill were taken last week by Natural Habitat Adventures guide Eddy Savage while exploring the tundra and water around the area. This particular group literally found some treasure under a rainbow when they came across a caribou on the tundra. Other incredible beluga whale encounters were quite close up with the zodiacs. A beautiful red fox was quite inquisitive toward the group and posed for some of the best shots we have seen in a long time.

All in all the weather for the week cooperated for the incredible wildlife viewing and a full exploration of the Churchill region was successful. What a week for seeing all the treasures around every rock or inlet in Churchill and on the water!

caribou on the Churchill tundra

A rainbow marks the spot a caribou pauses on the tundra in Churchill. Eddy Savage photo.

 

Red fox in Churchill.

A red fox is surprised by a group of Natural Habitat travelers while searching the land for food. Eddy Savage photo.

 

Zodiac of travelers in Churchill

A group of hearty Nat Hab travelers heads out on the Churchill River to view the beluga whales. Eddy Savage photo.

 

Halfway point beach in Churchill

Secluded beach at Halfway Point with hearty sea purslane growing above. Eddy Savage photo.

 

Polar Rover in Churchill.

Natural Habitat travelers pose with their massive Great White Bear polar rover in Churchill. Eddy Savage photo.

 

Fort Prince of Wales cannons.

Cannons on the walls of Fort Prince of Wales across from Churchill. Eddy Savage photo.

 

Beluga watchers from Natural Habitat in Churchill

A group of Natural Habitat travelers ready to roll and see some beluga whales. Eddy Savage photo.

 

Churchill Photo of the Week

Dorota Walkoski of Great White Bear Tours captured this harbinger of spring image in Churchill. Caribou, snow geese and Canada geese fill the landscape and feed on the bounty which the north provides this time of year! Bountiful Churchill summer will be upon us soon and avid explorers will flock to town for birding excursions, beluga whale charters and tundra exploring in search of fox, polar bears, Arctic hare and even wolves. This summer on the Hudson Bay is shaping up to be one of the most exciting in recent years. Stay posted for all the news and photos from the north!

Massive Caribou Herd in 360

Some of North America’s largest caribou herd – females only- are heading north toward Nunavik. The females head out of Quebec’s boreal forest a few weeks ahead of males to get settled in and have their calves. Averaging 20 km per day, the caribou will used their scoop – shaped hooves to dig for lichen deep beneath the snow to keep energy for the trek. Once they arrive in the north they will feast on a plethora of grasses and plants.

This amazing footage was captured by Wild Canadian Year film crew lead by filmmaker Justin McGuire. The crew flew by helicopter into the barren tundra region and placed a 360 degree camera ahead of the herd and hoped for the best.

“You find yourself in another world. It’s a landscape of quietness and caribou tracks – a vast expanse of compacted snow formed by thousands of moving animals.” stated McGuire . “We watched hopefully. After all our efforts, it would still take a bit of luck to get a our shot. And then – success! The migrating caribou passed right by the 360-camera, seemingly inquisitive of this foreign arrival in their land.”

The never – before – seen footage is truly unique and intimate!

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