Churchill Photo of the Week – Aurora

 

Northern lights over Ice Lake in Nunavut

Northern lights over Ice lake in Cape Dorset, Nunavut. Manny Noble photo.

Even though polar bear season is just around the corner with the possibility of viewing northern lights on clear nights, we can’t help but look ahead to January when the heart of aurora borealis season begins in Churchill. Once the Hudson Bay is frozen over, northern lights are fairly constant in the night skies of the far north. This recent shot above Ice Lake in Cape Dorset, Nunavut is just a sample of what can be seen in the heart of winter throughout the Arctic and sub – Arctic. What an incredible vista!

Around the Arctic Weekly Photos

These are some really stellar images we’ve gathered from the north country. These local photographers have taken some of the best shots we have seen in a long while. From wondrous northern lights to a family of polar bears roaming the shores of Chesterfield Inlet to a beautiful sunset in Cambridge Bay these iconic photos depict the Arctic landscape in all its majesty. Enjoy!

Hay River NWT northern lights

Hay River, NWT had an amazing aurora display this past week. Aaron Tambour photo.

 

polar bears in Chesterfield inlet

Three juvenile polar bears roaming the shore of Chesterfield Inlet, Nunavut. Leila Paugh photo.

 

Yellowknife aurora

Yellowknife from the Latham Island bridge. Collin Goyman photo.

 

Cambridge Bay sunset

Incredible sunset over Cambridge Bay, Nunavut. Kyle Sears photo.

 

Yukon’s Carcross Desert epic landscape. Fiona Solon photo.

Northern Lights Churchill Cabin

Can you believe the texture of these fantastic northern lights shots from Churchill photographer Alex De Vries – Magnifico? Just because aurora borealis season doesn’t technically start until January, that doesn’t mean the lights can’t appear in this dramatic fashion over a rustic cabin in Churchill, Manitoba…as they tend to do. Alex has a knack for finding new and creative settings in and around Churchill where he can capture the essence of this amazing phenomena! We are surely all getting excited about polar bear season which is just around the corner but northern lights season has an allure of its own that is indescribable. Lights can happen year – round in Churchill and the polar regions, however, polar bears can only be seen with assurance in October and November. Luckily polar bears have migrated to the ice by the time travelers arrive for northern lights in January! Both seasons are worth the trip north.

Churchill northern lights Alex De Vries Magnifico

Churchill cabin and northern lights

Aurora Borealis in Churchill, Manitoba

Northern lights cabin in Churchill, Manitoba

Churchill Sunday Photo – Sky Lights

Northern lights in manitoba

Gorgeous northern lights in The Pas, Manitoba. Andre Brandt photo.

Just when you thought you had seen every possible breathtaking northern lights image a few times over, Andre Brandt has captured the essence of how these magnificent effects affect us as humans. Emphasizing how small we feel in the presence of the grandeur of nature, the human figure in the foreground standing on a hay bail is perfect!  Come to Churchill and see these incredible sky lights of the north. Enjoy!

Cameras for Photographing the Northern lights

PRO TIPS

What is the “right” kind of camera for photographing the northern lights?

If you plan on traveling to a place for optimal viewing of the Northern Lights and plan to photograph them (I’m quite partial to Churchill, Canada), you’ll need to think about your camera equipment, as not all cameras have the capabilities to photograph the aurora.

Your Camera’s Capabilities

While actually getting the photo can be a little complicated (and I’ve outlined proper techniques HERE), determining if your camera can photograph them isn’t difficult at all.  While having a good quality lens is helpful, that’s usually not the limiting factor.  Instead, it’s your camera’s ability to shoot at long exposures while at a high ISO.

As a photo guide for Northern Lights Photo Expeditions, I’ve unfortunately seen some guests come with cameras that could shoot at long exposures, up to 30 seconds, and they could also get to high ISOs, 1600, and even 3200.  However, the camera could not do both at the same time.  This is a deal breaker!

Be sure to do some test shots at home (and at night) when evaluating whether your camera’s cut out for the job.

Deciding on the Right Lens

If you do have a point and shoot, and it’s passed the test from the above section – you’re all set!  No need to think much further.  However, if you have a camera with interchangeable lenses (or you’re thinking about upgrading to one), this section is important for which lens is right for the job.

Generally speaking, you should prioritize the angle of the lens vs. the speed of the lens.  You’ll often hear people saying that you need a fast lens…that is, one with a very wide maximum aperture, like f/2.8 or even f/1.4.  While this is helpful in getting the best photos possible, you don’t want to favor those apertures if it means you have to go with a 50mm or 85mm lens.  These just aren’t wide enough to get the full sky, let alone neat things in the foreground to give the shot context (like an igloo or inukshuk or people).

Thus, if you’re faced with the decision between a “normal” wide angle lens, like an 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 vs. a 50mm 1.4, you really ought to go with the 18-55mm.  You need to have the ability to get a lot of the scene in your photo.  A 50mm version of the same shot as above looks like this…

It just simple doesn’t have the same effect, does it?

So, if you have an assortment of lenses, I personally recommend you bring the widest lens you have as your #1 pick.

However, if you’re planning on purchasing a lens specifically for photographing the lights, here are a few recommendations.  Keep in mind that they can get pricey, because the technology inside them to “have your cake and eat it too” is pretty advanced…

My top picks: 24mm f/1.4; 16-35mm f/2.8; 14-24mm f/2.8; 14mm f/2.8; 17-40mm f/4; 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6; 24-70mm f/2.8; 24-105mm f/4

The “best” camera

To start, let me just say that virtually any DSLR or mirrorless camera body is great, and you’ll likely come home with stunning shots.  However, if you really want to know the best, and shoot with the best, you ought to think about investing in a full frame camera.  They are indeed an investment, but they are specialists at photographing in dim or dark conditions.  They have a larger sensor, which means you can get dramatically better shots in very suboptimal lighting conditions.

If you’re not sure you’re ready to invest in a fancy camera body, read no further, as these are usually well over a $1,000 commitment.  However, if you have a budget to get the best, I recommend getting a full frame camera.  If you’re interested in learning more about different camera bodies, including full frame cameras, read my article about full frame cameras HERE.

In Conclusion

There are many ways and many combinations of camera bodies, lenses, and advanced point and shoots that will work for capturing the northern lights.  If you are opting for an all-in-one system, like an advanced point and shoot camera, be sure to test it to make sure it can shoot at long exposures and high ISOs.  If you are picking out a lens, make sure it’s very wide angle then choose based on the fastest speed (aka, smallest f/number)…not the other way around.  If you’re aiming to upgrade your camera system, want the very best, and price is no issue – go for the splurge and get a full frame camera.

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