Churchill Photos of the Week

northern lights Canada

Incredible northern lights in Norman Wells, NWT. Nicky Lynn photo.


Shaking off the winter cold. Colby Brokvist photo.


polar bear in Churchill

Polar bear wandering along the land fast ice in Churchill. Rhonda Reid photo.


polar bear silver fox churchill, Manitoba

Awesome shot of a silver fox and polar bear in the Churchill Wildlife Management Area. Bill McPherson photo.


polar bear and polar rover

Polar bear under the back deck of a polar rover. Colby Brokvist photo.

Some amazing photos from the tundra in Churchill and sky above the Northwest Territories! The images we are receiving from the north have been just incredible all season long. Some exciting news as well that the ice that has been forming in the Hudson Bay has been blown to the north by some steady south winds. Hopefully, this will keep polar bears on land for the duration of the polar bear season in Churchill!

Churchill Photo of the Week – Wild Northern Lights

Aurora in NWT

Amazing aurora over Reid Lake in the Northwest Territories. Martin Male photo.

Photographer Martin Male took this surreal northern lights shot last Friday night in the NWT. What an amazing shot. Rarely have we seen aurora borealis that completely fill the sky like these did over Reid Lake.

“Sometimes even three cameras are not enough. We had three going out at Reid Lake last Friday night and we could only cover about half the sky. This was the incredible show we were treated to.”

Churchill Photo of the Week – Aurora Flight

Northwest Territories aurora borealis

On a flight over the southern Northwest Territories. Collin Goyman photo.

Keep your eyes on the northern skies tonight and Friday night, as some fiery Northern Lights will be poised to for a heightened display as a result of solar flare activity sending particles into our atmosphere. For those that are not far enough north, here’s the photo of the week with aurora borealis high in the sky above the southern Northwest Territories.

The Birth of Nunavut

It’s hard to believe that Canada’s newest territory is almost 16 years old. April 1, 1999 was the official date Nunavut separated from the Northwest Territories. Comprising a major portion of Northern Canada as well as most of the islands in the Arctic region, Nunavut is the fifth – largest country sub division in the world. Nunavut borders with Manitoba and the waters of the Hudson Bay are included in its borders.

The capital is Iqaluit, formerly Frobisher Bay on Baffin Island. Other major communities include the regional  centers of Rankin Inlet and Cambridge Bay. In the far north, Nunavut also includes Ellesmere Island as well as the eastern and southern portions of Victoria Island in the west as well as Akimiski Island in James Bay in the far south. It is the only region of Canada that is not connected to the rest of North America by highway.

The youngest territory is the least populous though largest in overall area of all the provinces and territories of Canada. With a mostly Inuit population of nearly 32,000, Nunavut is a sparsely settled region about the size of Western Europe. Alert, the northernmost inhabited place in the world, is also a part of Nunavut.

The territory of Nunavut. image.

The territory includes all of the islands in Hudson Bay, James Bay and Ungava Bay. If Nunavut were a country, it would rank 15th in area. The population density is 0.015 persons per square kilometer, one of the lowest in the world. Greenland has approximately the same area and nearly twice the population.  Nunavut’s highest point is Barbeau Peak (2,616 m (8,583 ft)) on Ellesmere Island. 

Nunavut’s coat of arms. Image courtesy of

Since the 1976 initial proposal by the 82 % Inuit population of Nunavut, the long journey to the current territorial status was delayed by disputes over land claims. So, after 23 years, the territory was born. It seems slightly odd that a native territory took that long to emerge as such. The name “Nunavut” is derived from the Inuit word for “our  land”.


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