Quilting the Northern Fabric

Veronica Puskas photo.

Veronica Puskas’ quilt Pillars of Strength. Canadian Quilters’ Association photo.

Veronica Puskas, a former resident of Nunavut’s Kivalliq region, recently won an award for Excellence in Work by a first-time exhibitor Quilt in St. Catharines, Ont. at Canada’s national juried show.

Pillars of Strength, is based on a 1950 photograph of her grandmother and mother near the Meliadine River by Rankin Inlet.

The quilt honors her grandmother, Puskas says, though making it also helped her to deal with some heavy emotions.

Veronica Puskas

Veronica Puskas uses Nunavut and the north as inspiration for her quilts and art. Veronica Puskas photo.

“I hope to encourage people that are going through difficult times that through doing some artwork or doing something to make something beautiful is very cathartic,” she says. “It helps you deal with the emotions and the hurt while doing it.”

Puskas says the project, which she began years ago and selected from over 80 entries, was truly a labor of love and family tribute.

“Mom used to tell us you can do better than that and that’s all I kept hearing.”

Chair of the event, Marilyn Michelin,says Puskas’ skill is outstanding.

“To do people in a picture is just unbelievable,” she says. “The talent that people have for that.”

Puskas, who now lives in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, will continue to use the north and particularly Nunavut as her inspiration for future quilting projects.

Iqaluit Snowstorm Rings In Fall

This early season in Nunavut’s capital city Iqaluit has signaled the beginning of a northern winter season. All across the Arctic and sub- Arctic, the temperatures are dropping and snow has either fallen or soon will be blowing in the air across tundra and Precambrian rock outcrops.

Churchill’s polar bear season, which begins in a week, will take on a different feel this year as the Hudson Bay Rail line is still inoperable and repairs are surely not going to be initiated before spring at this juncture. Hopes are high for an influx of travelers by air coming as usual to see the magnificent polar bears and other Arctic wildlife roaming the Churchill Wildlife Management Area and in the bluffs of Cape Merry. Their presence will give hope both financially and spiritually to Churchillians trying to withstand the isolation and strife the disaster to the rail – line has caused since last May.

Stay posted to our site for all the normal exciting news from polar bear season as well as updates on how townsfolk are dealing with no train service. Should be an exciting season with lots of news from Churchill!

Churchill Photo of the Week – Aurora


Northern lights over Ice Lake in Nunavut

Northern lights over Ice lake in Cape Dorset, Nunavut. Manny Noble photo.

Even though polar bear season is just around the corner with the possibility of viewing northern lights on clear nights, we can’t help but look ahead to January when the heart of aurora borealis season begins in Churchill. Once the Hudson Bay is frozen over, northern lights are fairly constant in the night skies of the far north. This recent shot above Ice Lake in Cape Dorset, Nunavut is just a sample of what can be seen in the heart of winter throughout the Arctic and sub – Arctic. What an incredible vista!

Nunavut Wildflowers and Wolves

Dwarf firewweed in Nunavut

Dwarf fireweed near Starvation Cove, Cambridge Bay, Nunavut. Mia Rachel photo.


Arctic cotton Nunavut

Arctic cotton in Sylvia Grinnell Park in Iqaluit, Nunavut. Gwenyth McQuarrie photo.


Wo;f pups Alert Nunavut

Wolf pups in Alert Nunavut. Peter Gilhuly photo.

These three outstanding shots from Nunavut characterize the northern Arctic summer in Nunavut. Churchill has its fantastic beluga whale season though the further north one goes the more there is to discover across the tundra! Enjoy!

Midnight Sun in Nunavut

This breathtaking photograph of the midnight sun emerging from the clouds on the horizon in Hall Beach, Nunavut is one of the best shots we have ever seen of the northern summer phenomena! The community has a population of around 850 and is located in the Qikiqtaaluk Region. Enjoy! The region is the easternmost area of Nunavut and the name is the Inuktitut word for Baffin Island. Enjoy!

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