Southern Polar Bears Show Decline

polar bears in Churchill

Polar bear mother and cub taking a breather lying on the Precambrian shield in Churchill Katie de Meulles photo.

All signs point to a decline in polar bear numbers in the southeastern region of the Hudson Bay, namely Churchill. Without even looking at the most recent statistics, there have been telltale changes in bear behavior that signal a potential shift in the polar bear population in the region.

A recent in-depth survey of polar bears in the world’s most southerly range indicates numbers have dropped and climate change is possibly rearing its head on the most accessible region to see these majestic creatures, Churchill!

Lead researcher and primary author of scientific paper Martyn Obbard focused on the polar bears residing on the shores of the James Bay and Hudson Bay known as the southern Hudson Bay population. Obbard collaborated with scientists from governments of Nunavut, Quebec and Ontario as well as the United States.

“If this trend is real and if it continues, I think we happened to have caught it just as it started to go over a cliff,” said Martyn Obbard, lead author of the paper that appeared this week in the journal Arctic Science.

A 17per cent decrease in five years, from 943 to 780 in that region has the scientific community on high alert. However, the more alarming number is a decrease from 12 percent to 5 percent of yearlings from 2011 to 2018.

“Many adult females may still be producing litters, but they may be less successful in raising cubs,” says the paper.

Studies over the last few years have reported what we have been seeing on average. Polar bears are getting skinnier and smaller from an annual reduction in the number of days of accessible sea ice

Between 1980 and 2012, research shows the number of days spent on land rather than on sea ice increased by 30 days. This time period severely reduces the amount of seal fat intake and leads to lower survival rates particularly for yearlings and less experienced hunters.

While the last survey of Hudson Bay polar bears conducted in 2011 showed population numbers fairly stable and in line with the previous 25 years of observations, Obbard wanted to quell the debate on both sides regarding the population. The latest ariel survey was conducted with rigor and quite comparable to the 2011 survey.

Obbard, recently retired from the Ontario government, cautions that having only two data points is not a conclusive study, the drop off observed is troubling at least.

“We’ve tried to be not alarmist. But we’ve tried to point out there are serious concerns,” stated Obbard.

While the years have produced images of polar bears seemingly adapting better to more ice-free days through finding alternative food sources or hunting seals on land or in the coastal shallows, Obbard’s most recent study validates impending warnings from researchers who have maintained that polar bear numbers would shrink like the ice when seal hunting days were reduced.

polar bear and seal kill churchill, MB

Polar bears have seemed to adapt in recent years to less “ice time” by hunting closer to shore. Alex De Vries – Magnifico photo.

“If we have a decline in body condition, what comes next? Declines in survival then decline in reproductive success,” he said. “And what are the consequences of those? The individual-level effects become population-level effects — declines in survival rates and now declines in abundance.”

Past warnings have been similar to what Obbard sees now. Everything points to climate change as the main end cause of polar bear body deterioration. The pure fact that sea ice has been reduced year over year cannot be ignored.

“It is disheartening,” Obbard states.

Another intensive survey should be scheduled for 2021 to further find an accurate baseline for the western and southern Hudson Bay populations according to Obbard.

Churchill Sunday Photo – Pop Up Polar Bear

Polar bear churchill

Polar bear peeking out through its napping area in the Churchill willows. Leah Okin Magowan photo

Polar bears bed down in the willows in the fall polar bear season in Churchill to conserve their energy and waning fat reserves. When they are aroused or catch a waft of some unusual smell they will pop up from their slumber ad shelter. Some of these sightings are the most exciting and memorable of a polar bear adventure to Churchill on the Hudson Bay!

Churchill Sunday Photos – Chillin

polar bear in Churchill

A polar bear basks in the cold with visions of ice on the Hudson Bay. Bonnie Chartier photo.

 

Churchill polar bear

Polar bear cleaning his fur in the fresh snow. Leah Okin Magowan photo.

 

polar bear in Churchill, Manitoba

A polar bear lounging in the refreshing Churchill snow. Alex De Vries-Magnifico photo.

 

polar bear cubs nursing churchill, Manitoba

Nursing polar bear cubs. Jeff Klofft photo.

Only five months to polar bear season so we all have some time to relax. Especially these polar bears from past seasons. Really great shots of the King of the north!

Churchill Video of the Week – Arviat

What’s it like living in Arviat near the Arctic Circle? The town of 2,500 – half are under the age of 19- coexists with polar bears roaming the streets and coast of the Hudson Bay. Leo Ikhakik helps keep the townspeople safe from polar bears by patrolling the area at night on his snowmobile. “It’s very scary to be out during the polar bear season”, says Leo’s daughter Lorraine, mother of six children. As global warming reduces the amount and duration of Arctic sea ice, the main hunting ground for the bears, the towns along the Hudson Bay like Arviat and Churchill see more year-round numbers of polar bears.

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